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The expanded 2018 comprehensive, downloadable Building & Construction library contains over 550 PDFs with some of the best technical information on stainless steel available globally.

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Stainless Solutions

IMOA’s »Stainless Solutions« e-newsletter covers a different stainless steel issue each month, with tips on design and specification, and links to technical resources.

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Sustainability: illustrations

The gleaming exteriors of New York City’s Chrysler (1930) and Socony Mobil (1954) buildings (left) show the long term sustainability of stainless steel as an architectural material.

Photo: Nickel Institute,
Catherine Houska photographer

Sustainable design concepts are being integrated into a wide range of projects. This coastal private elementary school in Pacific Palisades, California required a minimum service life of 50 years. To meet the need, designers selected low maintenance Type 316 (UNS S31600, EN 1.4401, SUS 316) for the roof and exterior panels (left and below).

Photo: www.millenniumtiles.com

The Canadian National Archives LAC Preservation Centre in Gatineau, Quebec (left) was designed by Ikoy Architects and was required to have a 500-year service life. It was completed in 1997. Part of the design strategy to meet that goal was to select corrosion resistant Type 316 L (UNS 31603, EN 1.4404, SUS 316L) for all the structural components outside the building envelope because the potential long term exposure to deicing and coastal salt and pollution were unknown.

Photo: Nickel Institute