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Further sustainability case studies published

05/03/2014

IMOA has published two more case studies showing how the unique properties of molybdenum are making a contribution to sustainable development in the automotive and power generation sectors.

The first study examines the increasing use of high-strength steel (HSS) in automotive design and the properties that make molybdenum an important alloying element in its production. Increasing the strength of steels in car bodies and chassis reduces overall car weight, fuel consumption and C02 emissions while increasing passenger safety. HSS enables weight reductions of 20-25%, with ultra HSS having the potential to reduce weight by a further 20%.

The second study looks at the use of molybdenum in the steels and superalloys used in modern fossil fuel power plants. Molybdenum increases high temperature strength and, in the case of nickel-based alloys, resistance to chlorine-containing flue gases.  These properties enable supercritical and new ultra-supercritical power plants to be run at higher temperatures, increasing thermal efficiency and delivering significant reductions in CO2 emissions.

Commenting on the publications, Tim Outteridge, IMOA Secretary-General, said: “These studies are part of IMOA’s ‘MoRE FOR LESS’ activity, highlighting the ways in which a small amount of molybdenum in a product or application can make a major contribution to the ecological, economic and social aspects of sustainable development. All five case studies are available to download from the sustainability section of the IMOA website.”

 

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Notes for editors

IMOA is a non-profit trade association representing the interests of most of the world’s molybdenum producers and converters, as well as consumers and traders. 

Molybdenum is added to steels and cast irons to improve strength, toughness, hardenability and weldability for numerous applications in the automotive, shipbuilding, construction, mining, chemical, oil & gas and energy generation industries.   

In stainless steels and superalloys, it improves corrosion resistance and high-temperature performance and finds uses in many industrial applications.  It is also used in a variety of products from catalysts and lubricants to pigments and paint.

 

For more information contact:

Alan Hughes
T: +44 (0)1606 852011
M: +44 (0)7759 243969

E: ahughes@imoa.info

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